Joseph Moore was a manufacturer of buttons and other similar products. He became wealthy and used his money to help people, for example by creating a dispensary for the poor where they could receive medicines. He was also a great lover of music. His friends James Watt and Matthew Boulton encouraged him to start a concert society.

Eventually he ended up running the Birmingham Triennial Festival – concerts which raised money for the Birmingham General Hospital. The Town Hall was built as a venue for the festivals, and its organ technically belonged to the hospital!

Drawing of Birmingham Town Hall in 1834, by Henry Harris (Birmingham Live)

Moore wrote to the composer Mendelssohn, asking him to come to Birmingham to play. In 1846, the first performance of Elijah, was at the Birmingham Festival.

Joseph Moore died in 1851 and was buried in Warstone Lane Cemetery (section D, grave 926). His memorial is very weathered and no inscription survives, but it does feature a harp design and a portrait of Joseph. The grave is close to the main pathway which leads from the Lodge to the Catacombs and is near to the Hipkins family tomb.

Further Reading

‘My favourite thing in Archives & Collections, Papers of Joseph Moore’, by Val Burchall, The Iron Room

Jewellery Quarter Cemeteries Project

Instagram

We are very excited about 'Diamonds in the Rough' a unique tour with storytelling & live performance, exploring queer history in the JQ Cemeteries for LGBT History Month.
Join Sheldon K Goodman and
Sacha Coward from @thecemeteryclub
on 12th-14th February:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/diamonds-in-the-rough-tour-tickets-251264879017

#lgbthistory #valentinesday #birmingham #jewelleryquarter #jewelleryquarterbirmingham #cemetery #tour #birminghamheritage
...

Released to celebrate the Winter Solstice 2021, this video explores some of the nocturnal animals which make the Jewellery Quarter Cemeteries their home. They might be hard to spot, but we can often see the traces they leave behind.

Emily Doyle @oldbort is a multidisciplinary visual artist who moved to the Jewellery Quarter as a student in 2015 and never left. Her practice focuses on the biological, looking for comfort in the physicality that connects us all during changing times. Throughout lockdown, Warstone Lane and Key Hill Cemeteries have been a source of inspiration and respite for Emily and the sites have shaped her creative output through 2020 and 2021, Like many, she has found the JQ Cemeteries to be a place of grounding and reflection.

Sustainability is at the forefront of Emily's work. The textile sculptures in this film were all made using reclaimed textiles, including some sourced through Scrapstore Birmingham.

This film commission was funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund, Birmingham City Council and Jewellery Quarter Development Trust

#cemetery #cemeterywildlife #fox #crochet #jewelleryquarterbirmingham
...

The star of the final @oldbort cemeyery seasons film of the year, which drops on 21st December has taken up residence right next to the @jqbid Christmas window at the Big Peg!
You can see this fox in his den anytime during the window trail. We can't wait for his on camera debut!
#crochet #creative #jewelleryquarter #birmingham #christmaswindow #jqchristmas #cemeterywildlife
...

This project is possible because of funding from: